Sons and Daughters of Honduras

So as the head and founder of the Sons and Daughters of Honduras, I have an obligation to mention it.

The Sons and Daughters of Honduras is the product of living in Honduras for 2 years. When I first arrived, I loathed the country, motivated primarily by my own biases and me placing the blame for some of the pain I felt on the country, and not accepting that it was no one’s fault. Over time I gradually softened and quietly grew happier. Before I knew it, I had fallen in love with Honduras, and had made a quiet promise to myself to return one day. Months later, when I first went to college, I officially announced the group. It would take time, but the numbers would grow to their current level of 229 members on Facebook, and a few hundred supporters on the “page” and not “group”.

The Sons and Daughters of Honduras is a location on the Internet for people to go and read about Honduras. I want it to be more than that, and one day it will be, but right now that’s what it is. It’s basically what might be a meeting place for people who want to work to transform Honduras, but is basically a giant chat room where only person chats. Despite this, I frequently chat with the people I’ve met through my efforts one on one, and individually I help and in turn am helped by, motivated Hondurans, who are tired of seeing the country pushed around by other countries and by big businesses. I have made a few friends due to this, and I hope to one day expand the Sons and Daughters of Honduras into a proper organization or political party of its own.

The original reasoning behind the Sons and Daughters of Honduras, was originally to act as a marketing firm. When I first arrived at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, I was actually an international business major. I wanted to use Honduras’s stunning landscape and bountiful resources to appeal to moderately sized businesses, not terribly large, but not small either, and get them to expand into Honduras. I’d give them special contracts with low rates of taxes, and make them hire Hondurans for all of the day to day management of their businesses. I was going to partner with the Honduran National Party, and becoming a government organization, so that I could give deals to the businesses that sought to expand into Honduras. Particularly when it relates to land. Using money earned from dealing with these businesses, I’d hire experts to consult with smaller businesses in Honduras owned by Hondurans and help them expand successfully through a series of low-interest loans. I wanted to combat Honduras’s lack of employment by appealing to international businesses, and using them to bolster the Honduran economy, before dealing directly with smaller Honduran businesses, and ensuring they succeeded. Over time this changed dramatically. But it was the original motivation.

Part of the changes were due to a political shift I had throughout college, but also partially due to my own continued studies of Honduras. If I was given the opportunity I’d likely pursue this original goal, but that is no longer the driving motivation I have. Overtime I’ve begun studying the corruption within the Honduran government, and within some of the more wealthy Honduran groups of businesses. I learned quickly that I couldn’t trust many within the government. Even in the future when many of the leaders are my age, and when I have a role within the Honduran government I will have to be careful. So I decided to start my own path. I decided I’d work alone at first, or with a small circle of established allies, and create my own path.

Overtime I became more and more known. I’m an unknown figure, but I’m a writer whose work has been published, whose words are taken somewhat seriously by a small, but growing number of individuals who are also politically inclined. My words have become published, and I am a figure who is not completely unknown. Overtime those who are aware of me, will grow in numbers, and I believe that together we’ll be capable of fostering real, genuine change.

I plan to create a company called the Sons and Daughters of Honduras to finance those who’ve decided they want to combat the corruption but don’t have the funds. For every man, woman, and child, who sees fit to step up and attempt to create change. The Sons and Daughters of Honduras is for true patriots who’ve decided to combat the evils that lurk in the Honduran wilderness, feeding off of the blood and labor of Hondurans who want more than survival. I plan to hire artists, marketers, and more, who want to see a new Honduras, better than before. One where hard work and talent are rewarded, not servile behavior for the sake of immediate gratification. I want to use the Sons and Daughters of Honduras to combat the Old Money circulating in the coffers of the politicians who merely do nothing. I plan to hire men and women who’ve had nothing, but remained above crime. I plan to give hope to those who’ve sought it out endlessly. That is my oath. My oath to the Honduran people, young and old. One day I’ll be there. And one day, change will come as surely as the moon rising over the horizon, as surely as the rain stopping, as surely as the day begins after a bloody night.

The Sons and Daughters of Honduras is a small step forward. It’s one way I plan to become known. It’s also an organization that I plan to make into a real group. You see I believe that someone’s passion for Honduras does not have to be a hobby. I believe that the passion I have, and my friends have, for Honduras can become fuel for our careers. I believe that we can make a living pursuing our dreams of bettering the country we love. I believe that my knowledge, and my understanding of Honduras can enable me to become a leader within the nation. I believe in applying what I’ve learned, and in motivating those who are on the edge of wanting to actively fight for Honduras, I believe I can help inspire the next set of Honduran leaders.

One day I plan to hire people. I plan to employ those who’ve been with me for so long. I plan to provide reliable employment to my allies, to ensure that we can literally afford to continue pursuing a better Honduras. One day I will look back and I will help those who’ve given me a platform, and have been involved in my dream, and in sharpening my opinion to the point that I can convince those who’ve decided to hear me out that I deserve a real shot at my dream, which is to help Honduras prosper.

One day I’ll chat with Honduran Presidents. One day I’ll be involved in crafting policies, both foreign and domestic, in Honduras. I’ll act as one of the liaisons between the Indigenous Peoples and the government. One day I’ll be sure to pay those who’ve helped me along the way a real wage. I’ll give them more than enough to educate their kids. I’ll be known as a figure in the Honduran History Books who helped remake the Honduran nation.

And one day the Sons and Daughters of Honduras will employ dreamers. One day the Sons and Daughters of Honduras will employ architects who will construct both affordable housing and mansions. One day the Sons and Daughters will employ teachers who go out to the most remote villages and give children there a wonderful education. One day the Sons and Daughters will finance politicians who dream of a Honduras without corruption. One day the Sons and Daughters will create schools throughout the countryside. A school for every pueblo.

I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one. I am but one voice shouting out for change, willing to bleed, willing to fight for a better tomorrow. I may seem a stranger, but my blood is the same as those who’ve bleed for independence, my spirit the same as those who advocated for safety. I am but one of the millions who is out there campaigning for change. My language might not be the same, the place I once called home is not the same, but I am as fiercely proud as anyone whose out there demanding equality.

I plan on transforming the Sons and Daughters of Honduras into a real organization. Would you like to help?

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Sons and Daughters of Honduras

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